English

Professors: D. M. La Guardia, J. S. McBratney, P. J. Metres, III, G. B. Bilgere, D. J. Rosenthal; Associate Professors: K. L. Gygli, B. K. Macaskill, M. Moroney (Chair), P. Kvidera, T. Pace, J. E. Feerick; Writing Center Director: M. Soriano Young

Students of English share in an enriched experience of imaginative language in which they read literature and produce lively, critical, creative, and professional writing. English majors learn to sharpen their analytical and writing powers, while studying literary works they can enjoy throughout their lives. Graduates with a degree in English flourish in law, business, government, education, research, medicine, and professional writing. Students majoring in English may choose the literature, creative writing, or professional writing track.

First-year English composition is required for all bachelor’s degrees. Placement in composition courses is determined by SAT or ACT scores, high school GPA, and/or demonstration of requisite writing skills. An AP English score of four or higher allows students to test out of EN 125. Students needing intensive instruction in English composition are assigned to EN 120-121. All others are assigned to EN 125. Writing assistance is available to all students, for any writing assignment in any program, through the Writing Center.

Refer to individual course listings for indicated prerequisites or special permissions.

Program Learning Goals in English (Literature Concentration).

Students will:

  1. Read texts with active, critical skill to form and articulate accomplished interpretations.
  2. Produce written analyses of literary texts that demonstrate awareness of audience, organizational sophistication, and clear argumentation.
  3. Recognize the employment and contextual use of the formal elements of language and genre.
  4. Build oral communication skills by listening to others' ideas and articulating their own responses and questions clearly to situate themselves in the conversation.
  5. Gain knowledge of cultural and historical contexts of Anglophone and translated literature that enhances their appreciation for the voices either within or marginalized by the texts.

Program Learning Goals in English (Creative Writing Concentration).

Students will:

  1. Read texts with active, critical skill to form and articulate accomplished interpretations.
  2. Produce multiple drafts of original creative works that are honed and revised through the peer workshop process.
  3. Produce written analyses of creative texts that demonstrate awareness of audience, artistic form, organizational sophistication, and clear argumentation.
  4. Recognize the employment and contextual use of the formal elements of language and genre.
  5. Build oral communication skills by listening to others' ideas and articulating their own responses and questions clearly to situate themselves in the conversation.
  6. Gain knowledge of cultural and historical contexts of Anglophone and translated creative works that enhance their appreciation for the voices either within or marginalized by the texts.

Program Learning Goals in English (Professional Writing Concentration).

Students will:

  1. Read texts with active, critical skill to form and articulate accomplished interpretations.
  2. Produce extended written analyses of literary texts, informed by research, that demonstrate awareness of audience, knowledge of critical theory, understanding of formal elements of language and genre, formulation of an original question or thesis within the field, sophisticated organization, and clear and persuasive argumentation.
  3. Build oral communication skills by listening to others' ideas and articulating their own responses and questions clearly to situate themselves in a larger critical and/or theoretical conversation that begins in but extends beyond the classroom.
  4. Gain knowledge of cultural and historical contexts of Anglophone and translated literature which enhances their appreciation for the voices either within or marginalized by the texts.
  5. Produce major and minor written works, demonstrate an understanding of the genre-specific uses of style and form in creative writing, and acquire an ability to use the self- and peer-revision processes to identify holistic and line-specific opportunities for improving creative texts.